If you are on this site as part of your research into buying a Tesla, you undoubtedly have or will come upon a bunch of new terminology that you may find intimidating and make you question what you are getting yourself into. Well, fear no more because on this page we will attempt to ease those fears buy translating “EV speak” into English……. 🙂

“Energy Usage”: This is referring to the amount of battery power being used, which you can simply think of it as how much gasoline your car is using.

“kWh”: Like on your home electric bill, this is the unit of measurement for electricity. When you read or see a reference to a battery being 90kWh, that is the amount of energy that battery can hold. Just as every gasoline car’s gas tank holds different amounts of gas, each Tesla models’ battery can hold different amounts of energy (kWh).

“Wh/mi”: This is watt hours per mile. Basically it is an EV’s MPG. So if in the past you shopped for a gasoline car based on its MPG rating, with an EV you would look at EVs with the best Wh/mi rating. This rating is often referred to as the car’s energy usage.

“ICE”: Within the EV “world/community”, this stands for Internal Combustion Engine.

“Regenerative Braking”: Despite what you may be thinking, this has nothing to do with the brakes. In a Tesla, when you lift off the accelerator, the car will immediately start slowing down. The faster you lift off the accelerator, the faster the car slows down. If you have ever driven a manual transmission car, this is akin to “engine braking” to slow the car down, except in a Tesla, in addition to slowing the car down the battery is getting recharged.

“Level 1 Charging”: This is basically you plugging your car into a standard 120V outlet at home. This will add about 4 miles of range per hour, to your battery.

“Level 2 Charger”: This is the most common public AC charger. With there being so many variables with regard to charging speeds, it’s futile to explain them all. Just know that these are not as fast as DC charging.

“Level 3 Charger”: This is typically called DC fast charging. Tesla’s Superchargers are DC chargers

“Home Charger”: Despite what you have read or think, you do not need to buy any special charging equipment to charge your Tesla at home. You can literally charge your car by plugging into a simple 120v outlet, because the charger is built into the car. Tesla does sell what people mistakenly call a “Tesla charger”, which is actually a High Power Wall Connector (HPWC). What you gain by buying/installing a HPWC is that is charges much faster than the standard 120v outlet and that it comes with its own cable. This way you can leave the cable that your car comes with, in your car. Teslas come with an adapter to plug into a 120v outlet and you can purchase an adapter to plug into a NEMA 14-50 outlet.

“J1772”: This is a type of connector used on public AC chargers.

“NEMA 14-50”: This is a type of outlet that most Tesla owners get installed at their homes. It is similar to the outlet behind your dryer, except it is rated for up to 50 amps. On a Tesla, depending on the model, this will add 29 miles of range per hour to your battery.

On the subject of adding miles and charging times, don’t listen to most of what you have heard about how long it takes to charge an EV. Often you will hear that it takes all night to charge up an EV, but that is only if you run the battery down to near empty before charging it. What those reviewers of EVs don’t tell you is that these are not gas cars that you run empty before refilling. With an EV, when you come home each day, you plug it in. Essentially you are always topping the battery off much like you do with your cell phone. So as mentioned above, a Tesla will charge up at least at 29 miles of range per hour. So if you drove 60 miles in the day, came home at 6 pm, the car would be done charging at basically 8 pm. It takes all of 5 seconds to plug the car in and then in the morning, 5 seconds to unplug.

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